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Japanese Foods Seen In Anime

Famous Foods Of Anime

Japanese cuisine is both ancient and eclectic, and has often adopted foreign foods: sometimes leaving them almost as originally, sometimes adapting them into a uniquely Japanese dish. A complete catalog of the Japanese kitchen would be far too extensive for our purposes, but these are some foods often referenced in anime.

 

Daikon

Daikon

A large, carrot-shaped root vegetable of the radish family. Mild-flavored, it is commonly diced and pickled.

 

Gyoza

Gyoza

Fried dumplings, small, usually with a ground or chopped meat filling.

Konnyaku

Konnyaku

In its most common form, a vegetable-based gelatin made from the flour of the konjac (kon-yak) or elephant yam plant. Sometimes made into noodles, it is often found in the form of a slab of greyish jelly which is added to other dishes for bulk and texture; like tofu, it has little flavor of its own.

 

Melon-pan

Melon Bread

Melon Bread. Sweet bread roll, the crust of which is scored to create an effect said to resemble a cantaloupe or other rough-rinded melon; the name does not refer to the taste. Probably introduced by the Portuguese in the 18th century; similar breads are also extremely popular in Central America.

Mirin

Mirin

A variety of sake which is used for cooking, usually sweeter and lower in alcohol content than regular sake.

Miso Soup

Miso Soup

A breakfast staple, using fermented soybean paste as a base. There are countless variations, depending on seasonal and regional variations, and the character of the bean paste used. A huge majority of Japanese eat miso soup at least once a day.

Nikuman

Nikuman

A steamed bun or dumpling, usually containing ground pork or beef. Very commonly sold by street vendors and popular at fairs. Cheap and so popular with college students.

Onigiri

Onigiri

Rice Balls. Can come in many different variations, but are almost always meant to be finger-food.

Ramen

Ramen

A kind of wheat noodle, often used in soups. As in the US, ramen is often associated stereotypically with poor college students. However, a bowl of ramen can be presented with a lot of enhancements.

Sake

Sake

An alcoholic beverage made from fermented rice. Countless local varieties, including those made to be served hot or cold.

Sashimi

Sashimi

Thinly sliced raw meat of some kind, most commonly fish. Unlike sushi, sashimi does not include rice.

Soba

Soba

A kind of buckwheat noodle, long and thin. Served alone with a dipping sauce or in broth.

Sukiyaki

Sukiyaki

Essentially Japan’s beef stew.

Sushi (maki)

Maki Sushi

A thin outer layer of seaweed rolled around a layer of rice and a core of other ingredients, such as raw fish and pickled vegetables.

Sushi (nigiri)

Nigiri Sushi

A thin slice of raw fish pressed over a mound of rice.

Taiyaki

Taiyaki

Waffle-like pastry in the shape of a fish which contains a sweet filling: traditionally red bean paste, but can also contain cheese, cream cheese, or even chocolate.

Takuyaki

Takoyaki

Octopus balls. Similar to American clam cakes, a baked doughy ball, with a piece of octopus in the middle. Usually served with a variety of toppings and sauces.

Tempura

Tempura

Not a food in itself, but a deep-frying method which cooks a thin crust onto a piece of meat or vegetable.

Tsukemono

Tsukemono

Pickled vegetables. Several different varieties, but most include daikon, ginger, onion, or cucumber.

Udon

Udon

A kind of wheat noodle, usually short and thick.

Wasabi

Wasabi

A very hot mustard-like condiment, sometimes called Japanese horseradish. Although horseradish is sometimes used to make a wasabi-like substitute, true wasabi is its own plant related to, but distinct from, horseradish.

Yakinuki

Yakinuki

Korean Barbecue. Marinated beef slices grilled individually over a brazier and eaten. Derives in part from Korean bulgogi. Popular in summer as a beach or cookout offering.

Yakisoba

Yakisoba

Long thin noodles, fried, usually in a savory sauce (distinct from soba).

Yakitori

Yakitori

Chicken shish-kebab, grilled on skewers. May include many different parts of the chicken which are not customarily eaten in the West.

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